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Job Ad Placement

Posted by Elena del Valle on May 30, 2019

Welcome to the HispanicMPR Job Ads page!

If you’re looking for a job, scroll down to see job ads. If you want to place an ad, see the next paragraph.

How to place an ad (if you visited this page before March 2019, please read this again as the instructions have changed)

Ads must list an employment opportunity or employment search related to business, Hispanic marketing, communication, public relations, media, events planning or other job fields.

Cost for one Job Ad: $100

The first 50 words will appear on the Job Ads main page. If your ad has more than 50 words, the words “click here to read the entire ad” will appear at the bottom of the ad with a hyperlink to the remaining text. See below for sample ads.

Cost for one Job Ad with Removal: $125

The first 50 words will appear on the Job Ads main page. If your ad has more than 50 words, the words “click here to read the entire ad” will appear at the bottom of the ad with a hyperlink to the remaining text. See below for sample ads.

In addition you may request removal of the Job Ad up to 3 months after placement provided you indicate the removal week at the time you place the Job Ad with Removal. Requests at a later date must be made by the person who placed the original Job Ad and will incur a higher rate.

Want extra visibility? Add your logo. Do you have your company logo in a jpg file (maximum size 100 x 100)? Add your logo for only $50 more.

Cost one Job Ad with jpg Logo: only $150

For your convenience you can pay online.

Step One Pay for the ad using the hyperlink below

Step Two After you submit payment using the hyperlink, send the ad within a week of payment in a Word file or in the body of the message by email to sales@hispanicmpr.com . If you’re submitting a Job Ad with jpg logo submit the job ad and graphic jpg logo at the same time. The jpg logo should be an attachment. Job Ads are nonrefundable.

Please submit copy in regular fonts with standard capitalization. Note: text in all caps, underline, extra bold or with special fonts or characters is not accepted. Ads are published in black. Formatting is removed as part of publishing process.

Ads will be published within a week (usually much sooner) in the Job Ads section of our website. In the event we make a mistake in the publishing process we must receive notification with 48 hours of publication so that we may make any corrections in a timely manner.

Note: Once submitted or published Job Ads may not be edited or modified in any way. The only exception is the Job Ad with Removal option.


HispanicMPR Job Ad



Thank you!

Click here for information or if you would like to place a Text Link Ad, graphic, audio or video ad



City of Oxnard, California – Communications and Marketing Manager

Posted by Elena del Valle on May 29, 2019

City of Oxnard, California

Communications and Marketing Manager
Annual salary range: $77,084.59 to $127,824.32 DOQ
The city provides an excellent benefits package.
Application deadline: Monday, July 1, 2019

Located on the beautiful Southern California coast, the City of Oxnard is the largest and most populous city – Click to read the entire Job Ad City of Oxnard, California – Communications and Marketing Manager

Podcast with Francisco Serrano about why an agile leader is key to success

Posted by Elena del Valle on May 20, 2019

Francisco Serrano, CEO, 121

Francisco Serrano, CEO, 121

Photo: Jesus Lara

A podcast interview with Francisco Serrano, CEO, 121 is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses why an agile leader is key to success with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Francisco, who is also president and chief speed officer of 121, is a branding specialist with over twenty years of experience in mid-to-large-sized national and international organizations. He has worked primarily in corporate and product development, brand strategy and brand architecture, packaging as well as in video and web development.

Prior to starting 121, Francisco worked as the director of Client Services at Alazraki, a leading advertising agency in Mexico. He also served in leadership roles at C&A, a European retail store conglomerate, where he headed communications management and new product development. Francisco has been a key player in international brand implementations for McCormick, Bayer, Heineken, Cadbury, OxiClean, Ferrero Rocher, and Hershey’s. He has worked in the launch strategy campaigns for RB’s Lysol and Air Wick.

To listen to the interview, scroll down until you see “Podcast” on the right hand side, then select “HMPR Francisco Serrano” and click on the play button below or download the MP3 file to your iPod or MP3 player to listen on the go, in your car or at home from the RSS feed. Some software will not allow flash, which may be necessary for the play button and podcast player. If that is your case, you will need to download the file to play it. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the May 2019 section of the podcast archive.

Sales specialist touts importance of transparency

Posted by Elena del Valle on May 8, 2019

The Transparency Sale
The Transparency Sale

Photos: Todd Caponi

Buyers want to know what the flaws are in a product. So much so that they favor bad reviews over good ones, according to Todd Caponi. He cares about sales methodology, learning theory and decision science. He is convinced that the key to sales success is transparency. In his first book, The Transparency Sale (Ideapress Publishing, $24.95) published last year, he seeks “to arm the modern seller with the knowledge, ideas, tools and actionable techniques to ready themselves for the future of sales; radical transparency.”

“The short answer is eighteen months, however, it’s not that simple,” Caponi said by email via his publicist when asked how many months or years the book required. “I first wrote about the idea for a publication back in May of 2017, and it went viral. The concept definitely resonated, so that signaled the beginning of the process. When you decide to write a book, the first step should always be to write a proposal, even if you’re intention is the self publish. It helps you vet out the likelihood of a successful book, and lays out your plan. I completed the proposal in November of 2017. The contract with my publisher, Ideapress, was signed in February of 2018, which kicked off the full-time writing process. The book officially launched in November of 2018.”

When asked whether is was his first book and what prompted him to write a new one book in an already crowded field he replied, “Yes, it is my first book, and yes, there are so many sales books out there. As a student of those books combined with years of experience as a seller and leader, I recognized a non-obvious evolution taking place in the world of sales. The proliferation of ratings, reviews and the accessibility of peer feedback is changing the way we buy. Beginning with Amazon’s launch in 1995, the idea of providing both positive and negative peer provided reviews appeared to help buyers predict what their experience will be following a purchase. In the twenty-four years since, reviews and feedback have permeated every meaningful purchase we make, from the products we buy, the experiences we select (restaurants, hotels, even Uber rides) and the apps we download. Buyers have come to rely on reviews and feedback, seeking reviews in 95 percent of their substantive purchases.

And, those reviews and feedback are no longer confined to just to B2C purchases. They are now inflating their way into the world of B2B, where a simple Google search allows buyers to easily review peer provided feedback on products through companies like G2Crowd, TrustRadius, and many others. Buyers can also peek inside the culture of the companies they’re considering making a purchase from through websites like Glassdoor.

Sellers have always been taught to sell perfection, that their product or service is perfect for the client. However due to this evolution, you can no longer hide your flaws and expect to get away with it. It must change the way we position and sell our products or services to build the trust necessary to end in a long-term successful outcome.”

Todd Caponi, author, The Transparency Sale

Todd Caponi, author, The Transparency Sale

When asked about the title of the book he replied, “The Transparency Sale is about giving buyers all of the information their brain requires to feel confident in making a buying decision. It starts with a better understanding of our buying brain in how we make decisions as consumers. Beyond reviews, building a better understanding of how decision making really works is key to improving your ability to sell anything to anyone. It begins with transparency, in that leading with your product’s flaws, with authenticity and honesty, sells better than positioning perfection.”

The primary target audience for the book? “The concepts of this book, all the way down to the way we position, present and negotiate, are immediately applicable and actionable to anyone who’s role requires them to influence other people to do something different tomorrow than they are doing today. That is primary sales professionals, but the feedback from cross-functional executives, recruiters, realtors, financial planners and marketers has been amazing.”

When asked about the controversy surrounding fake reviews and review sites that sell ads he replied, “The push for sellers to encourage, or even pay for fake reviews is ultimately doing themselves a disservice. It may sound counter intuitive, but negative reviews sell better than positive ones: As mentioned above, 95 percent of consumers read reviews before making an unfamiliar purchase of substance, and that number is growing; 82 percent of consumers seek out negative reviews, and that number is growing as well, which leads to the fundamental statistic driving the need to change. Purchase likelihood peaks when a product whose reviews are in the 4.2 to 4.5 star range. A 4.2 sells better than a product with a perfect five-star rating!

Sellers that cram as many 5-star reviews are actually eroding the trust they’re buyers have in them. Buyers are smart. They seek out the negative reviews, which actually HELP the buyer make a purchase. It happens with reviews in B2C, but also when we, as sellers, present our solutions as perfect. We’re driving buyers to find the flaws themselves. Own the conversation, lead with the flaws, build trust, shorten sales cycles, win more often.

In other words, in this non-obvious evolution happening in the world of sales, not only is leading with your solution’s flaws a requirement given the proliferation of reviews and feedback on everything we do, buy and experience, as it turns out (backed by brain science), it is also the fastest path to lasting trust, so regardless of reviews, it’s the right thing to do, anyway, having magical impacts on your results.”

The 193-page hardcover book is divided into five sections and 14 chapters. The author is keynote speaker, workshop leader and trainer as well as principal and founder of Sales Melon LLC.


The Transparency Sale

Click to buy The Transparency Sale


The Global Employee Engagement Crisis

Posted by Elena del Valle on May 1, 2019

By Javier O. Delgado
Chief executive officer of PeopleToo LLC

Javier O. Delgado, CEO, PeopleToo LLC

Javier O. Delgado, CEO, PeopleToo LLC

Photo: Javier O. Delgado

Article Takeaways

  • Employee engagement has barely budged in years
  • Measuring engagement isn’t sufficient to improve it
  • Five proven strategies can improve employee engagement

The world has an employee engagement crisis, with serious and potentially lasting repercussions for the global economy.

Though companies and leaders worldwide recognize the advantages of engagement, and many have instituted surveys to measure engagement — employee engagement has barely budged in 18 years. Click to read the entire Guest Article: The Global Employee Engagement Crisis