Monday, May 16, 2022

Podcast with Ivan Estrada, author, Brand With Purpose, about branding

Posted by Elena del Valle on May 2, 2022

 

Ivan Estrada, author Brand With Purpose

Ivan Estrada, author, Brand With Purpose

Ivan Estrada, author, Brand With Purpose

A podcast interview with Ivan Estrada, author, Brand With Purpose (see California realtor releases branding book with community financial support), is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses branding with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Ivan is chief executive officer of Ivan Estrada Properties, a real estate agent with 12 years of experience and public speaker. He created Brand With Ecosystem which contains Brand With Purpose, Brand With Video, and Brand With Podcast.

To listen to the interview, scroll down and click on the play button below. You can listen by looking for “Podcast” then select “HMPR Ivan Estrada” and download the MP3 file to your audio player. You can also find it on the RSS feed. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the May 2022 section of the podcast archive.

Podcast with Stanley Wong, co-founder, DistroScale, about streaming services targeting Hispanics

Posted by Elena del Valle on April 11, 2022

Stanley Wong, co-founder, DistroScale

Photo: DistroScale

A podcast interview with Stanley Wong, co-founder, DistroScale, is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses streaming services targeting Hispanics with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Stanley is vice president of marketing at DistroScale, a media technology company and the parent company to DistroTV, an independent network home to 150 live streaming channels.

Prior to his role at DistroScale, Stanley was an early Yahoo! employee (41st). Since Yahoo!, Stanley contributed to Search Physics (now known as Metavana). He also served as the vice president of Ad Products at Glam Media and co-founded Permuto (acquired by AOL and re-named Buysight)

To listen to the interview, scroll down and click on the play button below. You can listen by looking for “Podcast” then select “HMPR Stanley Wong” and download the MP3 file to your audio player. You can also find it on the RSS feed. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the April 2022 section of the podcast archive.

Video – Washington state tasked marketing agency to produce Hispanic oriented Covid-19 campaign

Posted by Elena del Valle on April 6, 2022

VacunaDeCovidWA.org

Washington Hispanic market campaign videos link to VacunaDeCovidWA.org

Photo: Tony Teran
Video: Washington State Department of Health

Hoping to reach Hispanics between 18 and 35 years of age hesitant about pandemic vaccines in Washington state with a pro Covid-19 vaccinations message the Washington State Department of Health hired C+C. The Seattle-based marketing agency produced audio and two video spots in Seattle. Production costs for Vacúnate Mijo/a were $168,000 and $205,000 for Mentira Mariachi. The ads were produced for broadcast distribution, YouTube, TikTok and radio. Scroll down to watch videos in English and Spanish (with subtitles).

When C+C conducted the initial research that led to the campaigns’ development, the team found that while most Hispanic people in Washington state were “very willing or somewhat willing” to take a Covid-19 vaccine more English-speaking survey respondents expressed vaccine hesitancy than Spanish speakers. Overall, 62 percent of survey takers said they were very willing or somewhat willing to receive a Covid-19 vaccine; 67 percent of Spanish speakers and 56 percent of English speakers said they were very or somewhat willing to get vaccinated; 2 percent of Spanish speakers who responded to the survey compared to 18 percent of English speakers who responded to it said they would not take the vaccine; 27 percent of Spanish speakers versus 23 percent of English speakers who answered questions said they were unsure; more English speakers than Spanish speakers said they thought Covid-19 vaccines may be unnecessary and ineffective; and more English speakers than Spanish speakers said they had other ways to protect themselves against the virus.

According to a C+C spokesperson the overall goal of the campaigns was “to increase vaccination rates among the Hispanic community in Washington by tackling key research findings. Misinformation on vaccine safety and efficacy was indicated as one of the main drivers of vaccine hesitancy among this community. While protecting themselves, their loved ones, and their community ranked as the main motivation for getting vaccinated.”

The agency addressed concerns about trust in the vaccines with emotional pleas to family ties, Spanish language and Mariachi music. Tony Teran, campaign writer and creative director, C+C, replied by email via an intermediary, “At the center of the Vacúnate Mijo/a campaign is the relationship between a grandchild and a grandmother or abuela, a much loved and nostalgic figure among many Hispanic/Latinx families, often seen as a trusted voice of reason. We follow their bond through different life stages that showcase the core of our message: protecting each other. The Spanish language is also a powerful connecting thread in these ads, as we hear the word mijo/a express different emotions at different times, a word so simple, yet incredibly purposeful. Abuela is saying ‘I care about you’ with every mijo and ultimately encouraging her grandchild to receive the vaccine.

The idea behind the Mentira Mariachi campaign is that we all listen to the voice of our conscience when making decisions. So, what if that voice came accompanied by trumpets and guitarrón, as in traditional Mariachi music, to remind audiences to listen to science and their good judgement, and not to misinformation? The :30 video spot shows a young guy at home. Every time he is exposed to fake news about the COVID-19 vaccines, he’s surprised by a Mariachi band popping out of nowhere to humorously remind him, with a catchy jingle, that those are mentiras (lies). At the end of the spot, we see him coming out of a vaccination site after getting his shot as Mariachi band members give him a nod of approval and a health care worker delivers the campaign’s tagline: ‘Escucha a la ciencia y a tu conciencia.’ (Listen to science and to your conscience.)”

The Vacúnate Mijo/ ad goal was to encourage community members to get vaccinated by emphasizing the importance of protecting their loved ones during the pandemic; while the Mentira Mariachi ad was meant to dissipate vaccine misinformation by encouraging the audience to “trust science.”

According to information provided by C+C the Hispanic population in the state represents 13 percent of the total population, yet in mid-July 2021, had 27 percent of the coronavirus cases, 19 percent of total hospitalizations, and 8.4 percent of total deaths in Washington; about 60 percent of the state’s Hispanic population remained unvaccinated, according to the Washington Department of Health.

Tony Teran, creative director, C+C

Tony Teran, creative director, C+C

“Creative concepting for both of the campaigns began in August 2021,” Teran replied when asked how many months the campaign project required. “Vacúnate Mijo/a launched in November 2021 while Mentira Mariachi launched in February 2022.

The C+C team used three different types of research when developing the strategy and concept for this Hispanic/Latinx-focused campaign: 1:1 Interviews, since 2020, the team has been conducting monthly 1:1 in-depth interviews with Hispanic/Latinx community members to learn about their overall attitudes, barriers and motivators for getting a COVID-19 vaccine.
Focus Groups, C+C conducted four focus groups with Hispanic/Latinx community members to test the campaign’s creative approach and gain insights into what type of creative would resonate most with the community. A total of 20 community members participated.

Secondary Research, The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and C+C worked hand-in-hand with partners like the University of Washington’s Latino Center for Health to analyze insights about vaccine hesitancy among the state’s Hispanic/Latinx population that helped shape the campaign, including a report released by the Center in April 2021. The team also referenced findings of COVID-19 surveys conducted regularly by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation/Civis Analytics.”

When asked how the agency measured results Teran replied, “We have been correlating the success of the campaigns with the increase in vaccination rates among Hispanic/Latinx adults in Washington. Approximately 63 percent of the Hispanic/Latinx community 18+ in Washington have initiated vaccination as of 3/25. This is up from 49.9 percent in November 2021 before the campaigns launched. This amounts to an increase of 13.1 percent. The overall vaccination gap has also closed by 7.4 percent among the Hispanic/Latinx community. The gap closed on Hispanic/Latinx community vaccination rates from being 29.5 percent behind the overall Washington state rates in November 2021 to only 22.1 percent behind in March 2022.”

The campaigns were developed and produced by a team that included members of Washington state’s Hispanic community, including Terán, the creative of Venezuelan roots behind the original concepts. He wrote the video and audio scripts, and oversaw the campaigns’ production process; featured Hispanic cast member for both campaigns; and the production team selected Spanish speaking talent seeking a cultural fit, and with good acting skills and on-camera presence, according to information provided by C+C.

The Vacúnate Mijo/a production included creative input from Mauricio Valadrian, of Valadrian Creative & Consulting; the Mentira Mariachi video production was co-directed by Marvin Lemus, director of Netflix’s Gentefied, and also a Hispanic creative; the Mentira Mariachi video and audio ads feature an original song written for that campaign by a Hispanic musician and performed on-screen by Tacoma-based Mariachi Ayutla, a mariachi band, according to information provided by C+C.

Mentira Mariachi ad in Spanish

Vacúnate Mijo ad in English

California realtor releases branding book with community financial support

Posted by Elena del Valle on March 30, 2022

Brand With Purpose

Brand With Purpose

Photos: book cover, Page Two Publications; author, Ian Maddox

With the help of sponsors and a GoFundMe campaign Los Angeles realtor Ivan Estrada dedicated some three years to the publication of Brand With Purpose Find Your Passion, Stay True to Your Story and Accelerate Your Career (Page Two, $25), a 277-page hardcover autobiographical branding book. According to the author the book is for anyone in business, not just real estate practitioners.

“Brand With Purpose is filled with tools and expert advice on growing your career and business, with enlightening case studies and inspirational wisdom from other successful trailblazers,” Estrada said by email via an intermediary. “In this book, Ivan recounts his journey of growing up Latinx, queer, and working class, and shares the critical lessons about personal growth and self-discovery he learned along the way.”

Ivan Estrada, author Brand With Purpose

Ivan Estrada, author, Brand With Purpose

When asked to define the primary target audience for the book he said, “The primary audience for this book is younger entrepreneurs and teenagers. This book is something that I wish I had early in my entrepreneurial career. Of course, I wouldn’t change a thing; I love where I am today. However, if I can change the path of a young entrepreneur or teenager, that would be amazing for me. Brand With Purpose is also for those looking to get inspired and be motivated. If someone feels stuck or needs a change of pace, this book would be great for them as well.”

Regarding funding of the title he said, “Yes, we did receive sponsorship funds and in-kind support. The Sponsorship funds came from Making Education The Answer (META) Foundation, Leap foundation, Junior League of Los Angeles, University of Southern California Lambda Scholars, The Harmony Project, and Youth Business Alliance. We also organized a Go fund-me teaming up with Next Gen to donate books to students in Los Angeles. I was blessed to have family, friends, coworkers and colleagues make contributions for the book as well.”

How will he measure success? “Just being able to influence one person and change their path, allowing them to go down a more authentic and purposeful path, is more than enough. I don’t make judgments wholly based on sales numbers and the revenue generated. If I can help just one person change their life to be more meaningful, authentic, and purposeful, it helps fuel my purpose. Since the book was published, I have had people reach out to me via text, email, and social media, telling me that the book changed their life in some shape or form, and that was when I knew the book was a success, and I hope I continue to find success.”

Podcast with Andrew Ross, author, Sunbelt Blues, about his book

Posted by Elena del Valle on March 7, 2022

Andrew Ross, author, Sunbelt Blues

Andrew Ross, author, Sunbelt Blues

Photo: Valerie Terranova

A podcast interview with Andrew Ross, author, Sunbelt Blues The Failure of American Housing (see NYU professor examines homelessness issues in Osceola County, FL), is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses his book with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Andrew Ross is professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. A contributor to The Guardian, The New York Times, The Nation, and Al Jazeera, he is the author or editor of more than twenty-five books, including Bird On Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City, Stone Men: The Palestinians Who Built Israel, The Celebration Chronicles: Life, Liberty and Property Values in Disney’s New Town.

To listen to the interview, scroll down and click on the play button below. You can listen by looking for “Podcast” then select “HMPR Andrew Ross” and download the MP3 file to your audio player. You can also find it on the RSS feed. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the February 2022 section of the podcast archive.

NYU professor examines homelessness issues in Osceola County, FL

Posted by Elena del Valle on February 16, 2022

Sunbelt Blues

Sunbelt Blues

Photo: Andrew Ross for book cover photo, Valerie terranova for author photo 

Andrew Ross, professor of social and cultural analysis at New York University (NYU), believes that housing is a human right. To explore housing issues in Osceola County he spent time in central Florida, between 2016 and 2020, meeting with public and private sector representatives, homeless advocates and homeless people living in motels and wooded land encampments. In Sunbelt Blues The Failure of American Housing (Metropolitan Books/Holt, $27.99), a 268-page hardcover book published in 2021, he shared his findings and thoughts about the housing issues in Osceola County and by extension other cities and states he believes present similar profiles and face comparable poverty and housing challenges.

From idea to publication the book he wrote for the general public required five years. When asked other than his salary as a professor at NYU what funding or support, if any, he received toward the book project and from whom he said by email “Research funding from NYU.”

Just how many homeless are there in Florida? That isn’t clear. One wooded area he visited in Osceola County, he says in the book, is home to as many as 15 camps of squatters many suffering from addiction. He pointed to a 2019 study that estimated 44 percent of homeless people in Florida (and 72 percent in California) were un-sheltered.

Andrew Ross, author, Sunbelt Blues

Andrew Ross, author, Sunbelt Blues

In the book he draws attention to the many people who become unhoused in central Florida after moving there in search of frost free living and jobs and find downward mobility instead. He points to the rise of a “rentership society” across the country. Private investors, whose identities are often hidden, have driven up the price of land, homes and rental rates while at the same time the money leaves the area, making tourist sites such as those in central Florida parasites on the surrounding region, he said in the book. In Sunbelt Blues he called for salary increases and rent control as well as nonprofit and public housing investments to counter the housing crisis in the state.

Just north of Osceola, in world famous Orlando, two thirds of residents are renters, according to his book. The majority of jobs in the region pay under $30,000 a year, he said in the book. At the same time Florida’s largest landowners, the Mormon Church, likely will decide the fate of North Ranch, a possible new city yet to be built for as many as half a million wealthy residents, according to his book.

The author said he will measure the success of the book depending on “Whether the book contributes to policy changes, or to changes in public consciousness (less difficult to gauge).” When asked what responsibility homeless people should have for their lack of housing he replied, “I would turn that question around and ask what responsibilities do employers, elected officials, and the real estate industry have for the lack of affordable housing.”

Given the repeated failures of governments dealing with homelessness what are the chances that local, state or national authorities will fix the problem in the next decade? His reply: “The scale of the housing crisis is so immense that comprehensive solutions are needed. The federal government is gridlocked, but can still do plenty in the way of expanding and upgrading its existing programs, while introducing new programs in public housing and social housing. Many local authorities are hamstrung by preemptive laws passed by state legislatures. These need to be repealed badly to allow counties and municipalities the flexibility they need to respond adequately,”

When asked if the owners of private land where the wood encampments are located are shouldering the burdens of the housing emergency in Osceola County he replied, “Not really. The encampments are generally on land that is not being used. When owners decide to develop the land, the camp dwellers get moved along to other locations.”

Podcast with documentary filmmaker Claudia Sparrow about Maxima

Posted by Elena del Valle on January 24, 2022

Filmmaker Claudia Sparrow
Filmmaker Claudia Sparrow

Photo, video: courtesy of Claudia Sparrow

A podcast interview with documentary filmmaker Claudia Sparrow is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, she discusses Maxima with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast. Scroll down to watch a Maxima trailer in English and Spanish with subtitles.

Claudia was born and raised in Lima, Peru. Her American Film Institute film El Americano won a 2009 Emmy Award in the drama category and she was a recipient of the 2009 Franklin J. Schaffner Fellow Award from the American Film Institute for directing that film.

Claudia’s first feature film I Remember You, starring Stefanie Butler and Joe Egender, premiered at the 2015 Downtown Film Festival Los Angeles, where it won the Best Feature Length Dramatic Film Award. I Remember You had a theatrical release in 2016 and remains available on major streaming platforms.

To listen to the interview, scroll down and click on the play button below. You can also listen by looking for “Podcast” then select “HMPR Claudia Sparrow” or download the MP3 file to your device or player. You can also find it on the RSS feed. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the January 2022 section of the podcast archive.

Watch the Maxima trailer below:

 

Author discusses San Francisco issues

Posted by Elena del Valle on January 12, 2022

San Fransicko

Photo: Harper

California has serious problems that have resulted in many residents departing the state in search of a better life. So much so that there is a cottage industry of businesses assisting residents to relocate. San Francisco and Los Angeles in particular, have an epidemic of homelessness and untreated addiction as well as a mental health crisis, according to Michael Shellenberger. In San Fransicko Why Progressives Ruin Cities (Harper, $28.99), a 395-page hardcover book published in 2021, he discusses his thoughts on the situation in the city and its environs.

In the book he outlines the notable rise of homelessness, runaway addiction, open use of illegal drugs in public places, rampant crime and mental illness; all of which he thinks have made the area and its streets unsafe and driven tens of thousands of people away from the state and especially from the general San Francisco area. He quotes policymakers, critics, advocates of change, former San Francisco homeless and former addicts.

Hoards of homeless people, often attracted to the city’s progressive policies and economic incentives for the homeless, have made their way to San Francisco and the surrounding areas resulting in frequently unpunished crime by over lenient prosecutors, public use of illicit drugs in parks and streets as well as widespread public urination and defecation in some neighborhoods, he says in the book. He illustrates the situation by explaining that between 2015 and 2018 the city replaced 300 lampposts corroded by urine (after one of the corroded lampposts crushed a car).

San Francisco doles out significant amounts of cash to the poor when compared with other cities; $709 per capita compared to $195, $120 and $.34 in New York City, Chicago and Phoenix, he says. The city’s permissive drug use programs and policies and its refusal to prosecute crimes has resulted in steep increases in the use of heroin, meth and fentanyl and brazen and booming crime. Those issues have made the city expensive, unsafe, and unattractive to many businesses and residents. Between 2008 and 2019, he says, 18,000 businesses such as Hewlett-Packard, Toyota and Charles Scwab, fled the state.

Addressing the underlying issues that have made drug use, homelessness and crime thrive along with fostering policies that improve the availability of housing may pave the way to a possible future solution, he says. Part of the solution outlined in the book would require Californians to agree to more suburbs and development in ranches and farmlands, while leaving the city itself with limited further housing.

He believes the crisis of disorder thriving in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle is spreading east. He describes a neoliberal model of government contracting to nonprofit service providers that are unaccountable as well as unable to address the crisis is underlying “the breakdown of civilization on America’s West Coast.”

Shellenberger is founder and president of Environmental Progress. He authored Apocalypse Never.

Podcast with Michael Harari, Ph.D., associate professor, FAU, about employability

Posted by Elena del Valle on December 13, 2021


Michael Harari, Ph.D., associate professor, Management Programs Department, Florida Atlantic University

Photo: Florida Atlantic University

A podcast interview with Michael Harari, Ph.D., associate professor, Management Programs Department, Florida Atlantic University, is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses employability with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

According to his bio he has published widely in the areas of job performance and performance appraisal, personality, talent acquisition, and careers; and his research has been published in leading academic journals and covered in BBC, Fox Business, Forbes, and Psychology Today. He serves on three journal editorial boards. He partners with organizations from local government agencies to international human resources consulting companies and vendors as a research partner and subject matter expert.

To listen to the interview, scroll down and click on the play button below. You can listen by looking for “Podcast” then select “HMPR Michael Harari, Ph.D.” and downloading the MP3 file to your audio player. You can also find it on the RSS feed. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the December 2021 section of the podcast archive.

GALA releases second edition of global sweepstakes laws

Posted by Elena del Valle on December 8, 2021

The Global Advertising Lawyers Alliance’s second edition of Sweepstakes & Contests

Photos: Global Advertising Lawyers Alliance, Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz, Venable LLP, Davis+Gilbert LLP

The Global Advertising Lawyers Alliance (GALA) released a second edition of Sweepstakes & Contests: A Global Legal Perspective (Global Advertising Lawyers Alliance, $99), a 535-page softcover book offering “a detailed overview of the laws governing sweepstakes and contests in more than 70 countries around the world.” The primary target audience for the book? Mainly in-house counsel as well as others working in the area of developing promotions and sweepstakes for their companies, according to a GALA spokesperson. Copies of the digital edition (PDF) are available, as of this writing, free of charge via GALA. Print copies are available via Amazon.

Jeffrey A. Greenbaum, partner, Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz

Three authors were responsible for the seven pages of the United States section: Melissa Steinman, partner, Venable LLP; Joseph Lewczak, partner, Davis+Gilbert LLP; and Jeffrey A. Greenbaum, partner, Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz. In addition to updating existing chapters on legal developments since the first edition was published the new edition has 17 additional countries.

The book is organized in alphabetical order by country. Each chapter summarizes how sweepstakes and contests are regulated in that country. It includes rules, filing requirements, prizes, tax liabilities, and important cases for each country.

Melissa Steinman, partner, Venable LLP

According to Steinman, who responded to questions via email with the help of a GALA intermediary, the most salient issues relating to sweepstakes and contests in the United States in the recent years are, “In the US, like in many/most countries, the biggest issue in sweepstakes and contests in the past couple of years was COVID. The circumstances of the pandemic forced promotion sponsors to face situations where a given travel prize might not be available or a promotion might need to be postponed or cancelled altogether? was legal raised interesting questions about consideration and healthcare privacy. Additionally, ‘Vax Sweepstakes’ became popular as many companies—and even some states—offered vaccine incentive programs in the form of sweepstakes to encourage vaccination. For example, United Airlines’ ‘Your Shot to Fly’ sweepstakes asked entrants to upload proof of vaccination to their United account for a chance to win to win airline tickets, and the state of Ohio offered one million dollars as a prize in its ‘Vax-a-Million Sweepstakes.’ These programs raise unique questions, such as (a) whether requiring a vaccine to participate is consideration; (b) whether the sponsor must allow for exemptions for medical and/or religious reasons; (c) health care privacy issues; and (d) (for employee promotions), potential labor/union issues. The FTC [Federal Trade Commission] also brought deceptive practices actions related to COVID, including promotions: in FTC v. Traffic Jam Events, 2:20-cv-1740 (2020), the FTC took action to halt a scheme by auto dealers that allegedly deceived consumers with ‘prize’ mailers supposedly directing them how to obtain federal COVID-19 stimulus benefits, which instead lured them to a used car sale.

We are also starting to see sweepstakes and contests involving cryptocurrency and NFTs [non fungible tokens]. A class action has been filed against a cryptocurrency exchange platform, Coinbase, over allegedly misleading sweepstakes advertising relating to Coinbase’s Dogecoin Sweepstakes. The complaint alleged that the sweepstakes was advertised in a deceptive and misleading way because the free method of entry was not clearly disclosed in email and website advertising, so entrants believed the only way to enter was by signing up for a Coinbase account and buying or selling $100 in Dogecoin. This is a familiar claim, but a new platform.”


Joseph Lewczak, partner, Davis+Gilbert LLP

According to Steinman, the most notable developments relating to sweepstakes and contests at a global level are “This past summer, Quebec, Canada changed its rule requiring registration of most game promotions. Prior to that, the Régie des alcools des courses et des jeux (Régie) in Quebec, Canada had strict registration and fee requirements that led many promotion sponsors deemed extremely cumbersome to exclude residents of Quebec from promotions. Now, so long as sweepstakes and contests are also open to entrants from outside of Canada and there is no Canada-only prize pool, such promotions are not subject to the Régie’s registration requirements. Note that like all advertising and promotion materials, including rules, must be translated into French for Quebec residents.”  And “Additionally, in 2019, Sweden’s new Gambling Act went into force. This law liberalized the rules on lotteries to the point where for the first time, promoters can offer promotional games of chance with no purchase required in Sweden—they were previously prohibited.”

The main difference between the first and second United States editions Steinman explained is that “We have added 17 new countries: Bosnia & Herzegovina, Cyprus, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia, Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, Kenya, Latvia, Lithuania, Nigeria, Romania, Serbia, Trinidad & Tobago, the United Arab Emirates, and Zimbabwe. We have added two new questions: Are raffles or charitable sweepstakes regulated differently than prize promotions offered by for-profit corporations? Are there any special rules for chance-based games, skill-based contests or other giveaways based on the audience that may enter (e.g., sweepstakes for children, employee contests, ladies’ night promotions, scholarships offered only to a minority group)?”

According to a recent press release, GALA is an alliance of lawyers located throughout the world with expertise and experience in advertising law. It has members representing more than 95 countries. GALA offers guides to advertising in a number of countries, including Advertising Law: A Global Legal Perspective, Ambush Marketing: A Global Legal Perspective, Privacy Law: A Global Legal Perspective on Data Protection Relating to Advertising and Marketing, and Social Media: A Global Legal Perspective. The organization is planning a webinar, Global Sweepstakes & Contests, moderated by Steinman to highlight key updates in the book, on January 27, 2022.