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Podcast with Jeff Kreisler, co-author, Dollars And Sense about behavior economics

Posted by Elena del Valle on April 22, 2019

Jeff Kreisler, co-author, Dollars And Sense

Jeff Kreisler, co-author, Dollars And Sense

Photo: Betsy Bell

A podcast interview with Jeff Kreisler, co-author, Dollars And Sense (see Authors explore behavioral economics issues) is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing and Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, he discusses behavioral economics with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

Kreisler’s bio describes him as “just a typical Princeton educated lawyer turned award-winning comedian, best-selling author and champion for behavioral economics.” His second book is Dollars And Sense: How We Misthink Money and How To Spend Smarter co-authored with Dan Ariely. He tries to use behavioral science, practical experience and humor to understand, explain and change the world.

Kreisler is editor-in-chief of PeopleScience.com. He won the Bill Hicks Spirit Award for Thought Provoking Comedy, writes for TV, politicians and chief executive officers.

To listen to the interview, scroll down until you see “Podcast” on the right hand side, then select “HMPR Jeff Kreisler” and click on the play button below or download the MP3 file to your iPod or MP3 player to listen on the go, in your car or at home from the RSS feed. Some software will not allow flash, which may be necessary for the play button and podcast player. If that is your case, you will need to download the file to play it. To download it, click on the arrow of the recording you wish to copy and save it to disk. The podcast will remain listed in the April 2019 section of the podcast archive.



UCLA HEALTH Executive Director, Communications

Posted by Elena del Valle on April 19, 2019

Position Summary

UCLA Health is seeking an experienced marketing and communications professional who can be visionary in developing the marketing agenda for the system. The Executive Director oversees the communication, a strategic media relations program designed to enhance the reputation of the UCLA Medical Enterprise nationally and in key markets, click here to read the entire Job Ad for UCLA HEALTH Executive Director, Communications

Authors explore behavioral economics issues

Posted by Elena del Valle on April 10, 2019

Dollars and Sense

Dollars and Sense

Photos: cover art by Leah Carlson-Stanisic, Jeff Kreisler photo by Betsy Bell

In Dollars and Sense: How We Misthink Money and How to Spend Smarter (Harper Paperbacks, $16.99), a 275-page softcover book published in 2018, Dan Ariely and Jeff Kreisler explore how we spend our funds. The authors question our financial decisions and basic assumptions about money. They suggest ways we might override long held habits and our own instincts to make better financial choices.

From idea to publication the project required four years. The book, filled with humorous touches, is easy to read. It is divided into three main parts and 18 chapters.

When asked about the primary target audience for the book Kreisler replied by email via his publicist, “Anyone who’s ever used money.”

Jeff Kreisler, co-author, Dollars and Sense

Jeff Kreisler, co-author, Dollars and Sense

Asked what expertise he has in behavioral economics and what drove him to write about the topic he said, “I’d worked with Dan Ariely on several projects and my past work – including Get Rich Cheating had touched on behavioral principles. I wanted to write about it because I became a convert to the way behavioral science combines traditional economic decision making with real human psychology to explain our flawed irrationality and to FIX EVERYTHING (maybe).”

Regarding promotional efforts for the book he said he was relying on “traditional publishing, interviews, speaking, HispanicMPR.”

Dan Ariely, co-author, Dollars and Sense
Dan Ariely, co-author, Dollars and Sense

“To help people make better decisions about money, or at least understand their decision making process which, in turn, would help reduce the stress and worry associated with not understanding money… and that, I hope, would lead them to live better lives,” he replied when asked about his main goal in writing the book.

Ariely is the James B Duke Professor of Psychology and Behavioral Economics at Duke University. He publishes in scholarly journals in economics, psychology, and business. He splits his time between Durham North Carolina and the rest of the world.

Kreisler is editor-in-chief of PeopleScience.com. He won the Bill Hicks Spirit Award for Thought Provoking Comedy, writes for television, politicians and chief executive officers. He tries to use behavioral science, practical experience and humor to understand, explain and change the world.


Dollars and Sense

Click to buy Dollars and Sense


Publisher releases Spanish language edition of children’s book

Posted by Elena del Valle on April 3, 2019

Si mi mama fuera ornitorrinco

Si mi mama fuera ornitorrinco

Photos: Science Naturally

Seventeen years after the publication of If My Mom Were a Platypus Science Naturally published a Spanish translation of the children’s book. Si mi mama fuera ornitorrinco (Science Naturally, $12.95), the 64-page softcover title written by Dia L. Michels, translated by The Spanish Group and illustrated by Andrew Barthelmes is filled with color illustrations and journal style sketches of animal babies and their families on most pages.

Author Dia Michels

Author Dia Michels

“The inspiration for the book came out of pregnancy misery,” said Michels when asked how the book came about. “I was so excited about being pregnant and becoming a mother – but my joy was soon mollified by round-the-clock morning sickness, frightening nightmares, and general wretchedness. I started researching other mammals to see who did pregnancy better than humans. Long story short, I decided that, for the purposes of pregnancy and breastfeeding, nothing could be better than being a platypus. The only way I could survive being pregnant was to could channel my inner-platypus. This desire to know how other mammals reproduced continued past the birth of my daughter, and pretty soon, I knew enough about mammal birth and breastfeeding to create a book. Many years of research went into parsing down which mammals to include. All it all, it took about a dozen years from idea to publication.”

She explained the book is used most frequently in a classroom setting, suggesting it might make a good addition to a home library for nature-minded children or gift for mothers with new babies. It works well as a read aloud option for children ages six to eight and as an independent reading reference text for ages eight to twelve and above. The publisher released free downloadable Teacher’s Guides, with hands-on activities, in English and Spanish.

Andrew Barthelmes, illustrator, Si mi mama fuera un ornitorrincoAndrew Barthelmes, illustrator, Si mi mama fuera un ornitorrinco

“I love learning about patterns and oddities in the mammal world, from hippos being the only mammal whose eyesight is just as good above water as below, to lions being among the only mammals that will wet nurse,” Michels said regarding the weirdes random fact about the mammals in the book. “My favorite random fact is that hooded seals, who spend their lives swimming in arctic waters, will only breed, whelp, and breastfeed on land. Why is that weird? They live where there is no land. The only way the species can survive is by procreating on sea ice—and hoping it doesn’t melt before they’re done!”

An inside page from the book

When asked how they are promoting the title Michels replied, “We are promoting this title at bilingual education conferences, parenting events, and STEM symposiums nationwide. We’ve also circulated a digital press release, advertised directly to our previous Spanish/bilingual customers, and reached out to those who bought the English edition of the book. We also sent an extensive pre-release mailing to libraries, media, and medical professionals. Additionally, we’ve partnered with literacy organizations, including First Book, to make the title available to students in Title I schools at a highly discounted price.”

The title reveals how fourteen mammals navigate the path from helpless infants to mature adults. It was designed for readers ages 10 to 14 and younger Read-Aloud listeners. The seals along the top of cover represent some of the awards it has won. The “NSTA Recommends” designation means it was endorsed by the National Science Teacher’s Association. The yellow seal is an award from Creative Child Magazine, a national publication for parents. The book was chosen by a panel of parents and educators for the Book of the Year award. The blue award is a Young Voices Foundation Seal of Approval, which honors books that inspire, mentor, and/or educate readers of all ages.